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Posted by on Dec 24, 2017 in Resilience | 0 comments

About the New Year

About the New Year

How do you think about resolutions, goals, and strategies for a new year?

If you have a system that works, keep it up! But perhaps, these thoughts will add some value or new dimensions to how you think about it.

1. Embrace your Intentional Growth Strategy. Ditch resolutions. In my experience, resolutions are one dimensional and guilt-ridden. One the other hand, an intentional growth strategy can encompass the concepts in the next 4 points.

2. Think rhythm. When we think of goals, we are tempted to only consider accomplishments. But, you will find great value in rhythmic goals. For instance, you might have the goal of 1 or 2 dates per month with a loved one. Or, you might consider another goal that needs to be repeated throughout the year. So, what you have is a rhythmic goal.

3. Think incremental. A targeted amount of savings might require an incremental approach, such as a certain amount saved per month or pay period. Exercise goals often work this way as well. If you want to run or bike a certain distance at a specific speed, you might set goals incrementally so you experience bite sized success toward the larger goal.

4. Make room for “did it or not” accomplishment goals. Some aims are one time events and we know very clearly whether we did it or not. Taking a vacation to Savannah, Georgia either happened or it didn’t. Likewise, planting a new tree or garden, completing your will, or buying a new car are examples of accomplishment goals.

5. Write it down and review it often. When it comes to your intentional growth strategy for the new year, this is most important. Whether you have three goals or twenty, you need to write it down and keep it in a place you will refer to often.

I carry a binder with me every day of the year that has my yearly goals, monthly goals, weekly plans, and daily plans to help me stay on track. Do I reach 100% of these goals? Not often. But for the years that I have kept a written Intentional Growth Strategy, I have accomplished a much higher percentage of rhythmic and accomplishment goals than I would have otherwise.

Worth Repeating

The greatest mistake you can make in life is to continually be afraid you will make one.

– Elbert Hubbard